Honour Ranch to assist veterans, first-responders suffering with PTSD

Honour Ranch to assist veterans, first-responders suffering with PTSD

Allan De Genova, the president of Honour House Society, addressing the crowd of more than 300 on Saturday in Thompson River Valley, with B.C. Ambulance Services paramedic Bob Parkinson to the right. Contributed THOMPSON RIVER VALLEY — The hills sweep down to the South Thompson River at the bottom of the valley and the fall trees are a silent explosion of yellow. Farmland and grazing horses surround the bucolic site, a quiet and peaceful place perfect for the new tenants. Honour Ranch will open in a few months, welcoming members of the armed forces, first responders and other uniformed personnel suffering with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). “Starting today we’ll get our programming in place,” said Allan De Genova, the president of Honour House Society. “We will save hundreds and hundreds of lives, beginning early in the new year.” Most of the money for the ranch came from donors, as did the furniture, washers and dryers, TVs. One anonymous donor provided $181,000 and Ian Porter, principal at Everest Realty Advisors, donated the land, a former adventure park called Zippity Doo Dah that had fallen into receivership. “Ian handed me the keys in January and said ‘make it happen,’” De Genova said as he tried to hold back tears. It’s been a long journey. For those unfamiliar with Honour House , De Genova was inspired by the story of Capt. Trevor Greene , a Canadian Armed Forces member attacked viciously with an axe to the head in Afghanistan in 2006. Honour House began operation in New Westminster in 2009, housing veterans, active soldiers and their families for free while they get treatment. To date more than 10,000 free nights have been offered. The idea for a ranch began a couple of years ago, and after Porter donated the land it snowballed. […]

Click here to view full artile at vancouversun.com