Landmark Study Identifies Six Genetic Markers of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Risk

Landmark Study Identifies Six Genetic Markers of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Risk

NEW YORK, Oct. 8, 2019 /PRNewswire/ — Cohen Veterans Bioscience (CVB), a non-profit organization dedicated to advancing brain health through data driven science, and the Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research at the Broad Institute at MIT and Harvard, announce findings from a study published in Nature Communications that identifies three genome wide genetic loci associated with PTSD risk. Landmark Study Identifies Six Genetic Markers of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Risk Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is the most commonly occurring and seriously impairing disorder that occurs after exposure to traumatic events, such as combat, sexual assault, and natural disaster. According to the World Health Organization, an estimated 3.6% of the world’s population has suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a given year. Trauma-related disorders are also a major contributor to risk for suicide – a devastating outcome affecting as many as 20 U.S. veterans per day. The risk of developing PTSD after experiencing trauma is heritable, but robust genetic markers had not yet been identified by previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Through this global collaboration, analyses were conducted on data and samples collected from multi-ethnic cohorts that included over 30,000 PTSD cases and 170,000 controls. The study, International meta-analysis of PTSD g enome-wide association studies identifies sex- and ancestry-specific genetic risk loci 1 , was able to demonstrate significant genetic correlations across 60 PTSD cohorts, including a UK Biobank dataset. In this largest GWAS meta-analysis of PTSD to date, a total of three genome-wide significant risk loci were identified, two in European and one in African-ancestry analyses. When analyzing the data based on sex, an additional three risk loci were identified in men – two in European and one in African ancestry. Along with other novel genes and non-coding RNAs, a Parkinson’s disease gene involved in dopamine regulation, PARK2, […]

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